Fashion celebrity Iris Apfel, known for her eccentric style, dies at 102

Iris Apfel, a textile expert, interior designer and fashion celebrity known for her eccentric style, has died. She was 102.

Her death was confirmed by her commercial agent, Lori Sale, who called Apfel “extraordinary.” No cause of death was given. It was also announced on her verified Instagram page on Friday, which a day earlier had celebrated that Leap Day represented her 102nd-and-a-half birthday.

Born Aug. 29, 1921, Apfel was famous for her irreverent, eye-catching outfits, mixing haute couture and oversized costume jewelry. A classic Apfel look would, for instance, pair a feather boa with strands of chunky beads, bangles and a jacket decorated with Native American beadwork.

With her big, round, black-rimmed glasses, bright red lipstick and short white hair, she stood out at every fashion show she attended.

Her style was the subject of museum exhibits and a documentary film, “Iris,” directed by Albert Maysles.

I’m not pretty, and I’ll never be pretty, but it doesn’t matter,” she once said. “I have something much better. I have style.”

Apfel enjoyed late-in-life fame on social media, amassing nearly 3 million followers on Instagram, where her profile declares: “More is more & Less is a Bore.” On TikTok, she drew 215,000 followers as she waxed wise on things fashion and style and promoted recent collaborations.

“Being stylish and being fashionable are two entirely different things,” she said in one TikTok video. “You can easily buy your way into being fashionable. Style, I think is in your DNA. It implies originality and courage.”

She never retired, telling “Today”: “I think retiring at any age is a fate worse than death. Just because a number comes up doesn’t mean you have to stop.”

Working alongside her was the honor of a lifetime. I will miss her daily calls,

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Fashion Icon Iris Apfel Dies Aged 102: What to Know

NEW YORK — Iris Apfel, a textile expert, interior designer and fashion celebrity known for her eccentric style, has died. She was 102.

Her death was confirmed by her commercial agent, Lori Sale, who called Apfel “extraordinary.” No cause of death was given. It was also announced on her verified Instagram page on Friday, which a day earlier had celebrated that Leap Day represented her 102nd-and-a-half birthday.

Born Aug. 29, 1921, Apfel was famous for her irreverent, eye-catching outfits, mixing haute couture and oversized costume jewelry. A classic Apfel look would, for instance, pair a feather boa with strands of chunky beads, bangles and a jacket decorated with Native American beadwork.

With her big, round, black-rimmed glasses, bright red lipstick and short white hair, she stood out at every fashion show she attended.

Her style was the subject of museum exhibits and a documentary film, “Iris,” directed by Albert Maysles.

“I’m not pretty, and I’ll never be pretty, but it doesn’t matter,” she once said. “I have something much better. I have style.”

Apfel enjoyed late-in-life fame on social media, amassing nearly 3 million apfel/”followers on Instagram, where her profile declares: “More is more & Less is a Bore.” On TikTok, she drew 215,000 followers as she waxed wise on things fashion and style and promoted recent collaborations.

“Being stylish and being fashionable are two entirely different things,” she said in one TikTok video. “You can easily buy your way into being fashionable. Style, I think is in your DNA. It implies originality and courage.”

She never retired, telling “Today”: “I think retiring at any age is a fate worse than death. Just because a number comes up doesn’t mean you have to stop.”

“Working alongside her was the honor of a lifetime. I will miss

Read the rest

Iris Apfel, eccentric fashion icon and textile expert, dies at 102

Beth J. Harpaz

NEW YORK — Iris Apfel, a textile expert, interior designer and fashion celebrity known for her eccentric style, has died. She was 102.

Her death was confirmed Friday by her commercial agent, Lori Sale, who called Apfel “extraordinary.” No cause of death was given. It was also announced on her verified Instagram account on Friday, which a day earlier had celebrated that Leap Day represented the 102 year old’s half birthday.

Born Aug. 29, 1921, Apfel was famous for her irreverent, eye-catching outfits, mixing haute couture and oversized costume jewelry. A classic Apfel look would, for instance, pair a feather boa with strands of chunky beads, bangles and a jacket decorated with Native American beadwork.

With her big, round, black-rimmed glasses, bright red lipstick and short white hair, she stood out at every fashion show she attended.

Her style was the subject of museum exhibits and a 2014 documentary film, “Iris,” directed by Albert Maysles.

“I’m not pretty, and I’ll never be pretty, but it doesn’t matter,” she once said. “I have something much better. I have style.”

Apfel enjoyed late-in-life fame on social media, amassing nearly 3 million followers on Instagram, where her profile declares: “More is more & Less is a Bore.” On TikTok, she drew 215,000 followers as she waxed wise on things fashion and style and promoted recent collaborations.

“Being stylish and being fashionable are two entirely different things,” she said in one TikTok video. “You can easily buy your way into being fashionable. Style, I think, is in your DNA. It implies originality and courage.”

Iris Apfel, known for her irreverant, eye-catching outfits, has died at 102, her representative said March 1.

Iris Apfel found retirement to be ‘a fate worse than death’

She never retired, telling “Today”: “I think retiring at any age is a fate worse than death. Just because a number comes up doesn’t mean

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Payal Pratap’s Lakme Fashion Week collection: A fusion of modernity and tradition Inspired by Kutch

For those who appreciate style and yet believe in experimenting, ace fashion designer Payal Pratap’s collection are perfect choice. Showing her love for Kutch, she presented the rich craft with a contemporary touch. The collection shown at Lakme Fashion Week is made of handwoven khadi cotton and handloom linens, woven stripes, chambray weaves, silks, and bandhani patterns on silk.

She got candid about her collection and how Kutch became her inspiration. Payal told ANI, “Three times I have drawn inspiration from Kutch. I love every bit of that region in terms of textile, craft and all the handwork they do. I use bits and pieces from there and use it in my collection.”

The fashion designer mentioned the asymmetrical wrap skirts, lungi trousers and extensive mixing and matching as things she enjoys about the area. She claims that Kutch is known for its wide range of outfits that resemble a tapestry made of hand stitching and needlework. Sharing fashion tips for the youth today, she said, “Have your own sense of style, it’s not always necessary to adopt Western culture. Use your own ideas that make you feel comfortable.” (ANI)

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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London Fashion Week Fall 2023: Burberry And JW Anderson Look Back With Pride

Expectations were high for this season’s London Fashion Week (LFW). A collective anticipation was palpable as guests sat back for Daniel Lee’s Burberry debut, JW Anderson’s dive into the archives, and what calendar mainstays had cooked up for the capital’s fashion crowd. 

What became clear early on in the schedule was that gimmicks were out. The industry waved goodbye to its previous penchant for spectacle-filled seasons, and welcomed a paired-back approach of quiet pragmatism. 

Following previous seasons packed with viral-worthy performances, designers chose to focus their attention on honing their craft.

Molly Goddard (whose collection generated $21,000 Instagram Earned Media Value (EMV), according to influencer marketing platform Lefty) invited her circle into the intimate setting of her namesake label’s atelier, where she presented a scaled-back display of the designs that have solidified her presence as a LFW pillar. 

Goddard’s preppy, tulle goodness underwent a toned-down rebrand, with the designer opting to revisit the ideas of simplicity and origin in her work. Show notes from the presentation read, “It’s not about drama or optics, but wearability and the joy of dressing.” 

Molly Goddard AW23 collection features sophisticated knitwear and tulle dresses. Photo: Molly Goddard

Influential names like Goddard prioritized streamlining over optics, showing that — this time — designers were calling for compliments for the clothes, rather than paying attention to what would make the rounds on TikTok. 

Even on Sunday, which boasted some of the biggest names of the week, London got the memo that flamboyant fashion needs a break. Sleepy models in smiley-face rompers weaved through the audience at JW Anderson, as street-cast faces chose comfort at Burberry on Monday evening, clutching checkered hot water bottles while swaddled in fur robes. 

Both designers decided to look back at their houses’ respective archives. Jonathan Anderson pulled references from his

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Molly Goddard Is Bringing The Fun Back To Fashion

The designer’s AW23 collection is a joyful homage to childhood fashion favorites

The designer’s AW23 collection is a joyful homage to childhood fashion favorites

Shown in her studio, Molly Goddard’s AW23 collection is all about reshifting her focus in fashion. The space is clean, stripped down – the optimal setting for a collection focused on the joy of dressing. Models exit from the atelier space and walk the runway of the showroom in eye-catching, playful designs, conjuring memories of playing dress up in your mom’s closet or flipping through pages of fashion magazines as a teen. Somehow, she is able to recapture those joyful moments.

While wearability is at the forefront of the collection, Goddard’s pieces remain exciting and lively, inspired by her own ideas of how she’d choose to style pieces coveted in fashion magazines. Teaming up with her stylist Alice Goddard, the two reminisced on their favorite closet staples in their childhood and teen years for inspiration (printed jeans, sporty knitwear, and Claire’s accessories being the most memorable) to create this collection full of not-so-subtle references to a time when fashion was – more than anything else – fun.

 

The result is flowing tulle skirts and dresses paired with fitted sweaters, animal prints, graphics, patterned outerwear and blue leopard denim. Bright pink mixed with geomoatric patterns mixed with studs mixed with button downs. And these are just a few of the highlights. Think the coolest school uniform you’d actually have wanted to wear – but now exists.

“We looked through the MG archive – pulling out pieces that had worked, and pieces that hadn’t – restyling, reshaping, changing the fabric, refining,” shared Molly on the creation process. “The result is a collection that feels nostalgic, familiar, grown up, wearable, streamlined.”

But for Goddard, even beyond playing with

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Dior Maison Looks to the Outdoors with Sam Baron

Dior Maison has enlisted the skills of French designer Sam Baron to create a collection of outdoor furniture, which features shapes and silhouettes based on the iconic Medallion chair.

The Dior Maison Outdoor Collection encompasses a chair and armchair, and two tables – one with a round top and the second with a square top. Each has been crafted from green metal, and manufactured in France, “in keeping to exceptional savoir-faire”, says Dior.

The oval shapes seen across the chairs echo that of the classic Medallion chair, which became a symbol of the Louis XVI style, and was a piece adopted by Christian Dior for seating guests at his fashion shows. For the outdoor chairs, these oval shapes have been filled with latticework metal, which appears on the table’s surfaces too. “These true objects of desire – and emblems of excellence,” Dior adds.

The pieces were previewed at this year’s Milan Design Week when Dior hosted a huge exhibition alongside designer Philippe Starck, who too had reimagined the Medallion chair to create a “Miss Dior” version. To mark its launch, the collection is now being presented inside The Pâtisserie at 30 Avenue Montaigne, Paris, as well as other Dior cafés around the world.

In other design news, Nendo has created a snaking tunnel in a woodland of red pine trees, which serves as a guesthouse and an archive for displaying furniture and artwork.

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